what president was a peanut farmer

Jimmy Carter, from peanuts to the Nobel Peace PrizeJimmy Carter, from peanuts to the Nobel Peace Prize

At the White House (1977-1981) he signed the Camp David agreements and the nuclear treaty with Moscow. The failed blitz of hostages in Tehran cost him re-election. So he returned to peanuts and to take care of human rights

“I have committed adultery several times because I have desired many women.” He confessed, just before being elected President, in a river interview granted to Playboy, a newspaper certainly not in line with his strict religious principles. Jimmy Carter was born in Georgia in 1924. The family has a small farm in a poor area mainly inhabited by African Americans. The father is for racial segregation but does not prevent Jimmy from dating the children of the laborers.

In 1943 Jimmy entered the Naval Academy(his height of 1.75 is at the minimum limit). At the age of 22, having just graduated in nuclear engineering, he married Rosalynn, with whom he had four children. He interrupted the secure military career in 1953, when his father died, to save the family business. The beginning is traumatic: Jimmy and Rosalynn end up living in communal houses for the poor but do not give up. He studies agricultural techniques, she manages techniques and soon peanut production becomes a profitable business.

Carter is an influential member of the Baptist Church and in 1962 he was elected to the Georgia Senate. Defending civil rights in the deep South is not easy or popular but he finds the way, with a lot of cunning.

A governor candidate in 1970, he stalked, expressing respect for Luther King but, at the same time, courting segregationist leader Wallace. It disappoints blacks but wins the election and as Governor surprises everyone, declaring the time for racial segregation to be over. In 1976 he won the Democratic primaries.

In that climate, being away from Washington, in every sense, help Carter get to the White House. The amnesty for the Vietnamese deserters was the first act of an unlucky presidency, marked by alternating phases of inflation and recession and the extremely serious energy crisis. Carter did well in foreign policy, signing the Camp David agreements on the Middle East and the nuclear treaty with the Soviets.

Then came the terrible 1979, with the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and above all the Iranian crisis, with the 58 Americans taken a hostage at the Embassy in Tehran on November 4, 1979. The crisis lasted more than a year and, after the tragically failed blitz of April 1980, it cost Carter re-election. The hostages were finally freed, not coincidentally, on January 20, 1981, the day of the

Jimmy Carter went back to cultivating peanuts but a year later he started, with his own Foundation, an intense activity in favor of peace and human rights that earned him the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 and that still accredits him as a famous leader esteemed worldwide. At 92 and after defeating cancer, he has 36 years of post-presidency. He is not considered a great President but, in an Ex ranking, Jimmy Carter is certainly first, for longevity and prestige.

How Farmers Control Farm Weeds

Before industrialization happened, farming was one of the biggest ventures of mankind and it is to this day, still one of the most important sectors in the world. From the beginning to of time, a lot of advancement has happened that changed the methods and strategies in farming. There are now many ways on how to make yields better and maximize the land value through precision agriculture.

However, there are still basic factors that affect farming that remains significant to this day. One of these is the growth of weeds along with plants. Weeds are technically also classified as plants but they are not the plants that we want. Seemingly so, we can pertain to them as plants that are in the wrong place at the wrong time. If they are not properly managed, they can cause a lot of loss in terms of the plant yield and they compromise the aesthetic value of the farm.

With this, there are ways on how farmers control farm weeds before they can do a lot of damage.

1. Buying a push weed eater.

If you own a meadow, you must be worried about the weeds. A good way is having a push weed eater. You simply push behind and weeds are easily removed. Of course, it’s not easy to choose a good push weed eater, You can refer to Peter reviews.

2. Plan the layout of plants to maximize the space.

When farmers do this, it gives no space for the weeds to grow out of. There is also a matter of making the types of plants you plant on the land as diverse as possible. As it is, naturally, diversity will prevent weeds from growing out since the spaces are already taken and the diversity is already achieved by the plant choices alone.

3. Prevent weeds from growing by mulching.

Plants need sunlight to grow and develop. Since weeds are plants, this element is crucial for them, too. Mulching is a method that basically covered part of the land that is not planted on with organic material like straw, dried leaves and such to prevent leaves from pushing through the surface by keeping them in the dark.

4. Using nature’s foragers as weed eaters.

Normally, farmers would like to avoid having animals in areas where they plant crops but in this case, they prove to be helpful in controlling weeds in the farm. Geese are examples of animals that can help regulating the weeds’ growth in the farm. Weeder geese have an inclination to eating weeds other than the leaves of plants. So, they are not only able to get food that they need, they also help farmers control unwanted weeds.

5. Planting crops on the land while waiting for it to replenish nutrients.

This is basically having a secondary plant choice to be planted while the main crop is not to be planted yet. This also prevents the land from being barren. As was reiterated again, the concept is not to leave the ground bare to prevent the growth of unwanted plants. Practically, too, instead of weeds, they find it better to plant something that they can actually use to maximize the land use.

There are many other techniques that farmers use to control weeds in the farm. They can be natural and some include the use of chemicals. In the long run, the basic principle is to be strategic in placing the plants and the layout of the farm and monitor it closely to avoid future economical loss and hassle.

What is farmer cheese?

Farm cheese is made in the traditional, traditional way, for a large part even by hand. The cries ‘traditional’, ‘artisanal’ and ‘handmade’ are commonplace these days. We will, therefore, try to make clear what distinguishes farmhouse cheese from other cheeses.

Traditionally, raw milk cheese is described with the protected term “farmer’s cheese”. It means that the Food and Commodities Act requires that if you put “farmhouse cheese” on cheese, it must be made from fresh, raw milk. However, variations on this term are not protected, and that starts the confusion for many.

What is raw milk cheese

Cheese with raw milk is made from milk that is not heated above 40 c. As a result, certain enzymes and microorganisms contained in the milk are not lost. During the ripening process, these micro-organisms do their work in the cheese and it gets its unique taste. Raw milk cheese often tastes spicier, fuller and has a slightly sour aftertaste.

Farm cheese versus factory cheese

Farm cheese and factory cheese clearly differ from each other, both in terms of preparation and taste (although the taste is a result of the preparation). The most important differences are in the preparation, treatment and fat content.

The preparation

The first difference is that cheese from the farm is prepared and matured manually. The cheese master stirs the cheese manually with the curd and lets it mature at his own pace. The farmers work with a feeling for and dedication to cheese, without losing sight of the current hygiene rules. Factory cheese is prepared by machines.

The treatment

Fresh milk from the cows is used to prepare farm cheese. This milk does not receive heat treatment, unlike factory cheese where this is the case. The almost untreated, raw milk gives the cheese of the farm its powerful and characteristic taste. The milk for factory cheese is first heated to 65 degrees Celsius for a few seconds, to kill bacteria. This pasteurization gives the producer more control over the end product.

The fat content

Another difference is the fat content. The fat content in farm cheese varies because it is a natural product that is not standardized. The differences in cow, soil, grass, feed and milk from the spring, summer and winter give the variations in fat content and taste. Factory cheese is standardized to a fixed fat percentage. That gives consistent quality and taste, which is required for mass production.

Types of farmhouse cheese

Enthusiasts immediately taste the difference between factory cheese and farm cheese. Farm cheese stimulates your taste buds because the traditional method of preparation makes farmhouse cheese never taste the same. The cows that walk outside in the summer and eat fresh grass produce different milk than when they are kept in the stable in winter. The changing flavors make this cheese so interesting.

Can you eat farmhouse cheese if you are pregnant?
You can eat farmer’s cheese if you are pregnant, provided that this cheese has a hard structure. A hard farmer’s cheese can contain listeria, but it does not survive because of the low moisture content of the cheese. However, semi-hard and soft cheeses should not be eaten during pregnancy.

What is a Yeoman Farmer?

Farmers have been known to exist ever since man learned to till the land and grow crops for food. Over time, as civilization grew, classifications of farmers came in handy since different aspects have been considered. Social class, geographical context and different interpretations are considered when it comes to classifying farmers.

One type of farmers is called yeoman. Aside from the fact they are not extremely known today, the term is not used in the present context and not something that just rolls off the tongue.

What is a yeoman farmer?

In social and geographical context, there are different definitions of a yeoman farmer. In America, they have been known to be farm owners. They own a substantial enough land and work on it with the help of family members. This makes them a model of what was known to be virtuous and self-sufficient way of American living known before. Yeoman farmers own the land they work on and did not rely on manpower outside the family. This kind of exemplifies a certain tight knit way of sustaining oneself in the Revolutionary era in America.

In the English context, not much is different in the definition. However, one distinction using the term yeomen in England was that it was used for classifying social class. Basically, they are free men who have ownership of meager land, which incidentally allows them voting rights in the parliamentary elections. As time went by, the definition of a yeoman in England has become limited to a more agricultural context making it more similar to the American definition. Yeomen are landowners. Still, however, there are different degrees to which a yeoman farmer is classified according to the size of the land they own.

In the modern context, it can be deduced that yeomen still exist based on the qualifications from the definitions set in both context. The main characteristics are:

• Yeoman farmers own the land they farm.

This is crucial because in our highly industrialized society, there still are people who till the land thus making up for the world supply of grains and food. However, farming commercial lands and being contracted as a labourer is different from having to work on your own land and living off it.

• They do not hire outside laborers.

In this context, yeoman farmers are people who work on the land owned by their families and probably passed on through generations. There is a kind of exclusivity here. They may be private farmers and some who remain close to the agricultural sector rather than be part of other commercial industries.

By the very definition from the traditional one, yeoman farmers are private farmers. They can either own vast expanse of land that remains within the family and not rented out or a piece of land where they get their sustenance from. Private growers may even be considered yeoman farmers because they fit both characteristics.

Either way, in a time where commercialization seems the way to go, even when definitions change, the values as emulated by yeoman farmers still reflect the value of hard work and honest living.

What is a Tenant Farmer?

A tenant is a person who leases a building, land or car that is owned by someone else. Therefore, a tenant farmer is a person who works or cultivate land that is owned by someone else commonly known as the landlord. He or she can pay rent with cash or a share of the crop produced. In tenant farming, the landlord usually contributes land, capital, and management while the tenant contributes their labor, capital and management. The returns of the production are shared by the two in different ways depending on the agreement between the tenant and the landowner.

Tenant farmers in different countries or system have different rights over the leased land. This is to protect both the tenant and the landowners from exploitation. The rights include tenancy at will whereby either the landlord or the tenant is allowed to end the contract at any time provided that they have a good reason for the action. In other instances, both parties make an agreement and sign a contract that covers a specified period of time.

In tenant farming, there are four basic types of hire, these are:

  1. • cash lease
  2. • crop sharing lease
  3. • livestock sharing lease
  4. • crop share lease

Cash lease

As the name suggests, in this type of lease the tenant uses cash to pay for the land. Both parties agree on a certain amount to be paid for a given period of time. The best thing about this type of lease is that the tenant has the right to manage or control the farm as they wish. In case the season is good, the tenant might pay less rent that in the other forms of lease.

Crop sharing

This is the most common type of tenant farming. The landlord and the tenant shares the returns for the crop produced. The amount to be shared vary and depends on the agreement by both parties but in most cases, it is usually 50 / 50. One disadvantage of this type of lease is that the tenant can pay more.

livestock sharing lease

This type of lease provide joint ownership of the basic herd to the tenant and the land owner. They share all the expenses and returns. For that reason, both parties work hard to make profits and also to ensure the success of the business.

Crop sharing cash lease

In this case, the tenant uses both cash and a part of the crop produced to pay for the land. It is advantageous to both parties.

Since the landowner is paid for the use of land by the tenant, he/ she is always determined to keep the farm land and other necessary properties in good condition. This is a great plus on the side of the tenant. Abuse only occurs in instances where the land owner has excess power and the tenants are poor.

Tenant farming is a great agricultural practice. This is because it allow the peasants and other people who have a small peace of land or who are landless to practice agriculture. A peasant farmer is also protected by the law in some countries. It is advantageous to the tenant if the lease is fare, if the land is in good condition for farming and the building and instruments are in a good state.